Fantasy Football: Anatomy of a League Champion

Fantasy Football results often feel like they are large outside of our control. Star player injuries and unpredictable player performances can make winning your fantasy football league feel like a crap shoot. From observing the trends of league champions for the past few years, it has become clear that luck plays a much smaller role…

Fantasy Football results often feel like they are large outside of our control. Star player injuries and unpredictable player performances can make winning your fantasy football league feel like a crap shoot. From observing the trends of league champions for the past few years, it has become clear that luck plays a much smaller role in our success or failure than is obvious to the casual player. To get a better sense of how this plays out, we are going to identify a few of the common player types. Which type of player are you?

Completely Clueless. This is the minimum of players to be sure so we will not spend much time discussing this type. The very fact that you have stumbled across this article proves you are not this player. This guy does not even really follow football. He's only playing fantasy football to fit in with co-workers or fill in a final roster spot and is only playing in the free leagues offered by the big sports media companies.

Solid But Casual. Most players fall into this group. These are your hardcore football fans who like to test their knowledge against their fantasy football competition, whether it be family, friends, co-workers or even strangers on the internet in fantasy football money leagues. This type of team owner will start hitting the player and fantasy news sites a few weeks before the first draft. He watches Sports Center and listens to sports news to stay up to date on the player value trends, and, more importantly, listens to the views and rankings of the “experts”. This guy is serious and is often indistinguishable, at least for the first few weeks, from the next category of player. What mostly differentiates this guy from the league champion is time. This player does not quite have the commitment level required to win on a consistent basis. He tends to start strong and fade as the season progresses. Not the recipe for winning.

The Fantasy Football Money League Champion! This team owner does his homework and takes the draft more seriously than everyone else. Due to the proliferation of expert ranking lists, this player will probably not stand out as the person to beat on draft day. The realization that this guy will be the eventual champion begins to emerge after the first couple of weeks. This owner is the most active on the waiver wire. While most of his pickups may not pan out, getting the one or two huge free agent pickups is the primary key to winning your league. This owner is also the most active in offering trade proposals. He will make a proposal to every team owner in the league. He makes proposals that no idiot would ever fall for. Do not take it personally, he's just trying to exploit the “Completely Clueless” types and he knows it's a volume business. He only has to get one lopsided trade past the league commissioner to make it worth his time.

The most important aspect to becoming the eventual champion is investing the time required to fully manage your team. The draft, and even injuries, are not as big of factors as we make them out to be. You have to be really committed to competing on the waiver wire and through trades if you want to win your leagues on a more regular basis.

To test your skills against the best competition online, you need to play at one of the sites offering money leagues . The quality of the team owners at the free sites is not a true test, especially when half of the owners abandon their league.

Fantasy Baseball Draft Strategies

Fantasy baseball draft strategies are seemingly a dime a dozen. Having the correct fantasy draft strategy to fit your league means being flexible and adapting to whatever situations that are thrown at you. After playing in hundreds of leagues over the years, I've been able to pick up on a few different strategies that you…

Fantasy baseball draft strategies are seemingly a dime a dozen. Having the correct fantasy draft strategy to fit your league means being flexible and adapting to whatever situations that are thrown at you. After playing in hundreds of leagues over the years, I've been able to pick up on a few different strategies that you should, or maybe, should not avoid. See what works for you.

The first piece of fantasy draft strategy advice revolves around keeper leagues that you've played in for awhile. In fact, this applies to new leagues as well if you are friends or at least talk with the other guys in your league. The goal is to become familiar with the stats and players that the other managers in your league are interested in. You should be able to spot patterns if they constantly talk about stockpiling certain stat categories, players from a certain team, and so on. For example, I've previously talked about my buddy in one of my fantasy football keeper leagues who never fails to draft as many Detroit Lions as possible. He lucked out this year that the Lions actually put a decent team on the field, but you get the point. You can typically rule out a certain manager if he determinates his draft strategy this way.

Another example is a buddy who's been in many of the same fantasy baseball leagues as myself. Sometimes I wonder if he's ever going to draft a pitcher. He always loads up on batters through the first half of the draft and it never fails that he ends up getting crushed in the pitching stats all year long. He can consider himself lucky if he somehow backdoors his way into the plays, although he did somehow manage to win one of our leagues last year. I chalk that up to luck.

The funniest draft manager is the pre-season stat scout. It is amazing how some skippers convince them that this year is going to be the big breakout year for so and so after the monster pre-season they had. They somehow blind themselves to the years of regular-season failure that have preceded this latest pre-season. I might love these fantasy owners the most as you can officially flush their season down the toilet before it's even begun. Pre-seasons are like the dress rehearsal at a wedding. The players do not care as they just want to get it over with as their exotic for the real deal. The veterans are either resting up or experimenting on new techniques, while coaches are auditing each Joe Blow they can find to see if their roster worthy. The offensive / defensive match-ups are always out of whack and it's impossible to get an accurate gauge on predicting regular-season success from these few weeks.

In closing, hopefully none of these above strategies describe you as a fantasy owner. If they do, I suggest you read through my other posts to learn about the best ways to improve your draft results by improving your fantasy draft strategy. While the season may be a marathon, it starts with a sprint that is the draft.

How to Become a No Limit Holdem Professional Poker Player?

To become a poker expert is a lot harder than we think. Winning a few sessions is not enough. You need to win again and again so that you can grow your bankroll even as you take money out of it for your personal operating cost such as food, rent and providing for a family.…

To become a poker expert is a lot harder than we think. Winning a few sessions is not enough. You need to win again and again so that you can grow your bankroll even as you take money out of it for your personal operating cost such as food, rent and providing for a family. You need to play even on days when you do not feel like playing, and you need to control yourself and play the same level of poker no matter how the cards are running or how bad you feel!

If you really decided to become a professional poker player, a series of study will be a vital element. You need to be repeatedly retooling and improving your poker game in order to stay in front of all the other sharks out there, and it is true studying will help you to do this. Here is a list of advanced program for becoming a poker professional.

Advanced Program Step 1: Exercise

Although poker is not an NBL World Championship competition it does require patience. When you sit at a poker table for at least two hours, it is really difficult to stay focused. Regular exercise is essential to be consistently successful at poker.

Advanced Program Step 2: Game Analysis

All legend players at any kind of game generally spend hours looking over their games. If you are a football or cricket professional you probably analyze your opponent's game before play against them. You probably have read all the important tactics and know the basics. Now you need to apply that knowledge. One way to do that is by carefully scrutinizing your hand histories.

Advanced Program Step 3: Critical Evaluation

You can find expert poker players who judge you can respect and get their input. Please do not count who claim to be making huge dollars. Monitor your opponent players and see for yourself. After playing a few sessions it should not be hard to disconnect the real winning players from the pretenders. If you can find some of these players to talk about your hands with you, you have a wonderful edge over your opponents. I am suggesting you do not let your ego get in the way of taking their advice. Some of these pros have been doing this for a long time and you have learned a lot of tips the hard way that you may now have the chance to learn at no cost.

Tossing and Turning: Fantasy Baseball Starting Pitcher Sleepers for 2012

Drafting starting pitchers in fantasy baseball can be quite a minefield. After the top 5 pitchers are off the board, there are many question marks at this volatile and unpredictable position. However, having a roster which contains several solid contributors is critical to fantasy baseball success. With 4 of the standard 5×5 categories directly influenced…

Drafting starting pitchers in fantasy baseball can be quite a minefield. After the top 5 pitchers are off the board, there are many question marks at this volatile and unpredictable position. However, having a roster which contains several solid contributors is critical to fantasy baseball success. With 4 of the standard 5×5 categories directly influenced by the strength (or weakness) of your starting pitchers, it is important to find some sleeper pitchers in the later rounds. Some pitchers who should contribute better numbers than their draft position may dictate in 2012 include:

Madison Bumgarner (SF)
Throw out a horrific.1 IP start in June of last year and Bumgarner was about as good as you can get last season. He boasts incredible control and a destructive slider which adds up to top ten potential at the position. Take a great second half, throw in impeccable control and a great pitchers park to call home and Bumgarner looks to be poised to take the next step in 2012.

Brandon McCarthy (OAK)
With Gio Gonzalez and Trevor Cahill departed for Washington and Arizona respectively, McCarthy is the de facto “ace” of the Athletics rotation. He has near elite level control, yielding few walks or home runs. His problem has been staying healthy enough to make an impact on your fantasy roster. Everything is pointing to a big season if he can just stay on the field. Worth the gamble.

Ryan Dempster (CHC)
Dempster saw an increase in his ERA but his peripherals remained very large. A high BABIP helped lead to a poor season which included a horrific April and a string of ineffective starts down the stretch. Dempster came into last season with some consistent seasons behind him and a slight improvement in his strikeouts and WHIP will put him right back to where he was in 2010. You should be able to pick him up on the cheap.

Ubaldo Jimenez (CLE)
Even an escape from the Coors Field launching pad did not help Jimenez last season. He was equally as ineffective pitching for the Tribe and saw a decline in his fastball velocity by approximately 3MPH. However, he has admitted to battling nagging finger and groin injuries in 2011 which caused him to shift his stride and landing spot upon delivery. He has been working hard to regain core strength in the off season. Expect a return to the velocity which made him one of the hardest throwers in the game to boost his effectiveness as well as his strikeout totals in 2012.

The key to fantasy baseball success is not simply drafting the top rated starting pitchers. The key to fantasy success is drafting starting pitchers who will perform better than their draft position dictates. Take a shot at a few of these sleepers and you may just reap the rewards in 2012.

Pen Pals: Fantasy Baseball Sleeper Relief Pitchers in 2012

There is a popular announcement among fantasy baseball owners which states, “Do not Pay for Saves.” In other words, it can be a little risky using early round draft picks on selecting closers. The position is notably volatile and closers often come and go through any given season. If you subscribe to this theory, it…

There is a popular announcement among fantasy baseball owners which states, “Do not Pay for Saves.” In other words, it can be a little risky using early round draft picks on selecting closers. The position is notably volatile and closers often come and go through any given season. If you subscribe to this theory, it may be in your best interest to consider some sleepers among relievers heading into your fantasy draft. Once the top few reliable pitchers are off the board, there are some relief pitchers who may provide good value in relation to where you should be able to get them in your draft.

Brett Myers (HOU)
In a somewhat surprise move, the Astros have named Myers as their closer for 2012. He makes a move from the starting rotation into the ninth innings role, one which he held briefly for the Phillies in 2007. Sure, Houston will not win many games this year, but the ones they do will most likely be close games and that means Myers should get his fair share of save opportunities. His fastball has seen a drop in velocity over the past few seasons, but the move to the bullpen may actually help. Without the prospect of throwing 200 innings, he can go out there and give it a little more gas this year.

Kenley Jansen (LAD) –
Manager Don Matttingly has stated that he is going into camp expecting Javy Guerra to be his team's closer. However, Jansen has the stuff to hold down the role, as his gaudy 16.10 K / 9 will attest. Sure, he's a little bit wild but he did end the year on a good note with a stellar September. He should wrestle the 9th inning role from Guerra at some point. When he does, he could be fantasy gold.

Brandon League (SEA)
With David Aardsma recovering from Tommy John surgery (and gone to the Yankees), the closer's role is League's. He appeared to work out his command issues with his nasty slider last season and it helped make him a much more effective pitcher. Seattle also has some decent middle infield defense and any games the club wins should be close. League could be a nice pick up.

Vinnie Pestano (CLE)
With closer Chris Perez out for 4-6 weeks with an oblique injury, Pestano could get a shot as Cleveland's closer sooner rather than later. Moving Pestano into the 9th inning role looks to be inevitable at any rate at some point in the future as Perez has seen a marked drop in his K / 9 over the past few seasons and was particularly inefficient in the second half of 2011. Pestano tops Perez in most peripherals, including a nifty 12.19 K / 9 and an utter dominance of right-handed batters.

David Robertson (NYY)
Robertson is one of the rare relief pitchers that does not need to get saves to give you fantasy value. However, one of these years, Mariano Rivera is going to start slowing down, right? Okay, maybe not, but if anything happens to Rivera in regards to injury, Robertson will be ready to step into the closer's role. At the very least, you will have one of the best bullpen arms on your fantasy roster ready to step into the ninth innning role on one of the best teams in baseball. That definitely has fantasy value.

If you do not walk away with one of the top fantasy baseball relief pitchers in 2012 at your draft, you can always turn to the sleeper picks. You might just get a surprise or two.

The Importance Of Fantasy Draft Focus

Previously, I've touched on the concept of focusing on winning certain categories while ignoring others. This is a critical tactic that I employ in every draft I participate in. In fact, I do not know how you can make educated picks without having some sort of predetermined focus. No one should go into a draft…

Previously, I've touched on the concept of focusing on winning certain categories while ignoring others. This is a critical tactic that I employ in every draft I participate in. In fact, I do not know how you can make educated picks without having some sort of predetermined focus. No one should go into a draft thinking that they will finish the draft with a perfectly well-rounded roster. That's nonsense. Your focus should be on stacking up players in 60-70% of the scoring categories in your league. This is just a little over half of them. Making your team as elite as possible in these categories will typically overwhelm the average fantasy manager who's built a team of mediocrity.

All to often, managers get sucked into the public perception of taking a certain player because he's being hyped up in the media or lost 15 pounds. To me, history proves everything. Take a look at what they've done in the past. While there are always up and down years, an adequate amount of research will determine if the player is legit and has a legitimate shot at a repeat performance. There are always exceptions to the rule, but all we can do as fantasy owners is maximize our odds through preparation.

I tend to stay away from rookies, or even even 2nd year players in many cases without my research really convinces me otherwise. 2nd year players often see a sophomore slump while rookies are simply headline grabbers. They have not proven anything and rare is the exception to this rule. Stick with players who are in or near the peak of their careers. For the most part, the quality of their team does not mean much. Every year, some of the best players in any sport are on non-contending teams.

Now back to category focus. This is where you pre-draft fantasy research comes into play. Find the screening categories you want to focus on and cross-reference that against roster positions. You need to make sure your researching correlating stats such as homeruns and rbi's or passing yards and touchdowns. The positions that include the few amount of players that match up to the categories you're focusing on should be given priority. Do not need to take them with an early pick, but be sure to note when it is getting close to their average draft position. The goal is to get the top-tier players that match up with the categories you''re focusing on.

I've found that many times this means that I'm not focusing on the glory stats like homeruns or rushing yards. I'll pick other focuses like batting average, runs, and stolen bases or receiving yards and touchdowns. Many times it can help to go against the popular belief as most other managers will be following that train of thought. Use this to your advantage to build a team full of players that will punish their shortcomings.

In head-to-head formats, you only need to take one more category than the other team to consider it a win. Over the course of the season, this method is almost guaranteed to get you into the playoffs. And as they say, once you're in, anything can happen.

Fantasy Draft Mistakes

Wow, where do I begin? I've made so many mistakes in past fantasy league drafts that I've lost count. Today, we'll review several of the mistakes I and many others have made in hope that you will avoid the same pitfalls. While it is always fun to laugh at the computer screen at the expense…

Wow, where do I begin? I've made so many mistakes in past fantasy league drafts that I've lost count. Today, we'll review several of the mistakes I and many others have made in hope that you will avoid the same pitfalls. While it is always fun to laugh at the computer screen at the expense of someone else 'draft blunder, it's not quite so funny when we're the one making the questionable move.

The first mistake is drafting players because they're on your “team. For me, that was the all the Detroit teams including the Tigers, Lions, Pistons, and Red Wings. While I'm all about supporting the hometown team, it should not be done at the disadvantage of your fantasy season. In fact, I love when I end up with players from my hometown clubs as it helps me keep track of their season and the team all the better. The problem occurs when we place additional value on those players and end up drafting them much earlier than they deserve.

This goes for any fantasy sport. For instance, in last fall's fantasy football draft, one of my buddies started snatching up every Lion's defensive player they could get their hands on. First, he did not even have the offensive portion of his roster filled out yet and, secondly, defensive players stats count so little towards the overall point total that everyone else waited until the last picks of the draft to take those positions. Needless to say, those Lions were dropped off his roster a couple of weeks into the season.

Another common mistake is honing in on one specific category. The most glaring example of this is the saves category in fantasy baseball. I use to stack up closers in the draft and would end up with five or six, one time I drafted eight of them. Yikes! They pitch very few innings and rarely do not accumulate many strikeouts or contribute much to lowering ERA or WHIP. Not to mention that already there are about 15 closer changes through the league. Without I can take a good value pick on a top-end closer that has locked down the position and consistently performed at a high level for several years, I'm holding off on closers until later in the draft and still taking two or three at most.

Starting pitchers, for example, contribute significantly to innings pitched, wins, strikeouts, ERA, and WHIP in most standard format leagues. The point is to win the most categories, not just one or two otherwise you are not going to get very far. I strongly suggest that you put off drafting for saves until the second half of the draft unless you can get a great value at that point in the draft.

One mistake that I'm proud to say I've never been a part of is the drafting of worthless positions like kickers or catchers before the last round or two of the draft. Based on my decade + of experience in fantasy drafts, you are always going to have the manager who takes the “best” kicker, catcher, etc well before anyone else had even considered doing so. Just breathe a sigh of relief and target that week on your schedule for a bye week because that guy's team is not going now. These positions are easily replaceable off of the waiver wire with little drop-off in production.

In summary, please take these lessons to heart. Keep your professional sports team loyalty in perspective, do not get caught up in specialty players that only contribute to one or two categories, and definitely refuse to get catech up in the hype of drafting low-value positions too early in the draft. These tips should help steer you in the right direction in your upcoming drafts. Please subscribe to Fantasy Draft Strategy to read more tips, tactics, and advice.

Position In Your Fantasy Draft

Years ago, I used to drop out of fantasy league after league until I could get into one where I had the first overall pick in the fantasy draft. If I was one of the last positions in the draft order, then there was no way I even had a chance at winning the league.…

Years ago, I used to drop out of fantasy league after league until I could get into one where I had the first overall pick in the fantasy draft. If I was one of the last positions in the draft order, then there was no way I even had a chance at winning the league. Well, ever I just sick of this process and decided I'd just make do with the cards I'd been dealt. I wish I would have figured this out sooner.

Your draft position is something that I believe has little overall impact on the quality of your team. While the top few overall picks of the draft will allow you the chance to snag the cream of the crop, you have to remember that most draft orders snake. Snaking drafts are when the managers draft in order in the first round and then reverse from there on out. If you have ten managers and you have the 2nd pick in the first round, then you would have the 9th (19th overall) pick of the second round. Once a draft gets past the first couple of rounds, then your position has no impact at all.

However, your strategy will change depending on if you pick in the middle of or near the beginning or the end of a round. Let's use the same example from above. If you are the 2nd pick, then you will have a lot of time on your hands to figure out what direction you want to take your team based on who you took with your first pick. However, you're going to have two quick picks coming up as you will have pick # 19 of the second round and then pick # 22 (2nd pick of the 3rd round). I'll explain about “directions to take your team” a little further on.

If you are 5th or 6th in the draft order, then you are right smack in the middle. You'll feel a nice even flow through the draft and be able to better predict who will be available since you'll only be waiting nine turns before you pick again. It is easier to do quick follow-up research on the best of the available players and really narrow down on who will fit best on your team.

Earlier, I mentioned taking your team in a certain direction. You should have multiple goals in mind before your draft starts. I stand by my long-held belief that a balanced team equals a mediocre team. You should focus on having more strong categories than weaker categories, but adding players to simply balance out your team is not going to get you anywhere in your draft. The first few rounds of your draft should be in harmony with each other.

In fantasy baseball for instance, if you start out drafting a 40 homerun / year slugger and then proceed to draft a bunch of speedy guys after that, what good are that slugger's home runs going to do over the course of the year? They will become meaningless without you draft a bunch of sluggers who all hit homeruns, drive in RBI's, and score a lot of runs. So, mold your team based on your first few picks in the draft. Many times I will take the best player available early on and let that decide my team's future.

Take a deep breath this year when you see you are picking dead last. With a solid fantasy draft strategy in place, your draft position is of little importance in building a team to win your league's fantasy championship. Be sure to sign up for more free advice on building a championship-worthy fantasy team.

When To Draft Your Fantasy Team

As the 2012 fantasy baseball draft season gets underway, I'm having trouble restraining myself from signing up for an early draft even though I've seen the disastrous results in years past. Drafting early is much like playing with fire. There are so many injuries that occurs during spring training, so many “what-if's?”, Numerous position battles,…

As the 2012 fantasy baseball draft season gets underway, I'm having trouble restraining myself from signing up for an early draft even though I've seen the disastrous results in years past. Drafting early is much like playing with fire. There are so many injuries that occurs during spring training, so many “what-if's?”, Numerous position battles, and myriad factors that can dismantle your post-season run before it's even begun. After 11 seasons of fantasy addiction, I'm proud to say I've kicked the habit.

Sure, the urge is still there. It probably always will be. There's nothing like oothing and ahhing over your latest hand-picked masterpiece. Fortunately (or unfortunately), I've learned that the timing of your draft can play a major role in determining your season's success. In fact, I'd argue that this is one of the most overlooked, yet most critical, keys to winning your fantasy championship. While the draft itself is such a small portion of the overall season, your strategy and timing will form your season and the direction of your squad.

My suggestion is to wait until you're within a week of the regular season. Most rosters will be set by this point, the star players start to get some time off to rest up before the regular season begins, and many of the major decisions of players starting the season on the DL will have been made by this point. The smart fantasy owner will better their odds in any way possible, and this is a surefire way to do just that.

An example of what can happen if you do not wait long enough can be found in one of my keeper leagues. I urged our commissioner in last fall's fantasy football season to wait as late in the pre-season as possible for our live draft. We ended up drafting around two weeks before the season. It is a keeper league and I owned Peyton Manning. Our draft ended up taking place two days before it was announced that he had another major neck surgery and was out indefinitely. This was a detrimental blow to my team and I had a major uphill battle all season long. If we would have waited to draft within a week of the season, then this would have completely changed my draft strategy as well as the outcome of my season.

You might be thinking that this gives all the owners in the draft that same advantages. That is true to an extent. However, simply drafting right before the season starts is only an advantage if you do your homework. The player research still has to be done otherwise you'll be in the dark about player statuses. Many default rankings on the major fantasy sports sites do not update on a regular basis in the pre-season, so it is up to the smart fantasy owner to develop their own fantasy draft strategy.

If your goal is to win your fantasy league, then your work begins in the off-season. Preparation ahead of the draft is critical and knowing when to draft your team is an invaluable part of the process. Please bookmark this site and continue to check back often as additional tips, tactics, and advise will be offered that will improve your chances of winning a championship and bragging rights.

Outfield of Dreams: Fantasy Baseball Sleeper Outfielders in 2012

The outfield has become a mining ground for fantasy baseball owners looking for the best players for their rosters. In fact, according to last season's ESPN player rater, 5 of the top ten fantasy players were outfielders. If you are not able to grab one of the top ten fantasy outfielders for 2012, you do…

The outfield has become a mining ground for fantasy baseball owners looking for the best players for their rosters. In fact, according to last season's ESPN player rater, 5 of the top ten fantasy players were outfielders. If you are not able to grab one of the top ten fantasy outfielders for 2012, you do not need to worry. There are plenty of sleeper picks at the outfield position this season. These are some names to consider heading into your draft:

Logan Morrison (MIA)
A mid-August minor league demotion was probably due as much to his personality as it was due to his performance (although a poor average after the All Star break was obviously not help matters much). With a new park, new teams and a new manager in the equal tweet-happy Ozzie Guillen, Morrison could have been primed for a very big campaign in 2012.

Dexter Fowler (COL)
A poor start, partly due to an abdominal strain, saw Fowler sent down to the minor leagues in the middle of the 2011 season. His tendency to hit balls in the air should lead to an increase in home runs in his 4th big league season. He has been frustrating both fantasy owners and Rockies management with his lack of success in the stolen base department. However, he started hitting and running at a much improved clip in the second half and could break out big time atop the line up in Coors Field this year.

Alex Rios (CWS)
Sure, Rios was brutal last year, but he was not the only member of the White Sox to have a subpar season (Adam Dunn and Gordon Beckham, please step forward). Rios battled a nagging toe injury for the majority of 2011 which may have accounted for his poor stolen base total. He also suffered a career worst.237 BABIP (a full 69 points below the previous season). Better health and better luck should translate into a bounce back 2012 campaign for this 5 category contributor.

Adam Jones (BAL)
Fantasy owners love consistent players. However, when that consistency comes in the form of players who tend to fly under the radar, you have the makings of a sleeper. People in baseball have been waiting for Jones to put up elite numbers for several years now. Keep in mind that he is only 26 years old. With 4 big league seasons under his belt and squarely entering his prime, Jones is nominated to break out as a major 5 category contributor as early as this season. Do not be surprised if he ends up among the top 20 outfielders come season's end.

Jason Heyward (ATL)
After bursting out of the gate in April with 6 HR and 13 RBI, Heyward fell apart over the rest of the 2011 season. Chalk it up to a nagging shoulder injury and getting bounced around the line up. Heyward should settle into the 5th or 6th spot in the Braves batting order and show off the 5-tool player that he really is when healthy. 2012 could be a monster year for a player with despite the most raw talent in the game.

Outfield is a deep position. Career years in 2011 may see some players over-valued at the position. As a result, keep an eye out for fantasy sleepers in the outfield at your draft and you very well may just end up with an “outfield of dreams” on your 2012 fantasy roster.