2010 Fantasy Football League Sleepers

Here are the players picked to be fantasy football sleepers for the upcoming 2010 NFL season. Jeremy Maclin- Part of the Dynamic Duo in Philadelphia with running mate Desean Jackson, expect Maclin to take his game to the next level. With Kevin Kolb being touted as the next Aaron Rodgers, Maclin will be able to…

Here are the players picked to be fantasy football sleepers for the upcoming 2010 NFL season.

Jeremy Maclin-
Part of the Dynamic Duo in Philadelphia with running mate Desean Jackson, expect Maclin to take his game to the next level. With Kevin Kolb being touted as the next Aaron Rodgers, Maclin will be able to showcase why the Eagles drafted him in the first round last year.

Brandon Jacobs-
Brandon Jacobs is only a year removed from a 1100 yard, 15 TD season. The Giants know they need to get Jacobs involved early and often to soften up opposing defenses. After all, this was the strategy that made them Super Bowl champs. Look for them to get back to what works.

Malcolm Floyd-
With Vincent Jackson out of the picture, another receiver will emerge and that receiver is most likely Malcolm Floyd. At 6'5 “, he's built like VJax, so expect him to fill those shoes quite neat. big plays.

LaDainian Tomlinson-
With QB Mark Sanchez still in the developmental stage of his career, look for LT to be explained early and often. Shonn Green failed to catch a single pass during the regular season last year, so expect Tomlinson to be in there on virtually all 3rd downs.

Tim Hightower
Wells is clearly the more gifted rusher of the two, but with QB Matt Leinart behind center, Hightower is the best fit for the offense. Hightower will be used on the majority of passing downs because he is the superior receiver and pass blocker. Now with “Captain Checkdown” running the show in Arizona, look for Hightower to improve on the 63 receptions he had last year.

NFL Weekly Picks Alert for Fantasy Players

In 2008, the New York Giants became trendy NFL weekly picks every week by running the Earth, Wind and Fire combination of Brandon Jacobs, Ahmad Bradshaw and Derrick Ward to an NFC East division title. Two years later, things have changed as Ward has moved on and Bradshaw has been named the new starter for…

In 2008, the New York Giants became trendy NFL weekly picks every week by running the Earth, Wind and Fire combination of Brandon Jacobs, Ahmad Bradshaw and Derrick Ward to an NFC East division title.

Two years later, things have changed as Ward has moved on and Bradshaw has been named the new starter for the G-Men. If you wonder how the move affects Brandon Jacobs, just ask him. Chances are his silence will speak volumes. Last week, Jacobs publicly voiced his displeasure over his role and spoke with head coach Tom Coughlin. When he was asked for further clarification after Wednesday's practice, Jacobs avoided the questions by walking away from reporters circling his locker.

Right now, it does not matter if he says it verbally because Jacobs' demeanor has told everyone all that they need to know about his feelings about being number two on the depth chart. For the past three seasons, Jacobs has been the lead show pony in Big Blue's running back stable. He was a 1,000-yard rusher in 2007 and 2008 respectively splitting carries, sometimes three ways.

Even in 2009, when Bradshaw began to see a few more of Jacobs' touches, the big back still ran for 835 yards. But he looked different. Jacobs seemed more tentative getting to the hole. His burst seemed gone. After posting 12 runs of 20 yards or more in 2008, that number fell to just 2 the following season. He appeared to lose his nose for the end zone, scoring only 5 times in '09 after running for 15 touchdowns the season before. That last number is especially troubling for a 6'4 “, 265 pound bulldozer who began his NFL life as a short-yardage and goal-line specialist.

Enter Ahmad Bradshaw. The fourth-year back has steadily earned more playing time during his tenure in New York – working his way way up from a kick-returner to a sponsor that made Derrick Ward expendable. And it's about more running the ball. Last season, Bradshaw caught 21 passes and appearances to be a more reliable receiver out of the backfield and Jacobs has ever been.

Lest all ye who drafted Brandon Jacobs for your fantasy teams start to panic, keep in mind that while Bradshaw will probably get a lot of work between the 20s, Jacobs will still likely be the number one goal-line option for the Giants. That means touchdowns are still a high potential for Jacobs owners. It also means that Ahmad Bradshaw may give you value in certain matchups for owners choosing their NFL weekly Picks.

For this week, whichever back you have, they're best used as a number three or flex position back until you get a better sense of how the Giants plan on rotating the two of them.

Fantasy Sports Addiction

Have You Become Hooked On Fantasy Sports? You have? Me, too! I love going through the draft picks and finding the best players in their category. Of course, there are a few other things to consider, when you are forming the best fantasy sports team. However, staying active in the sport is the first thing…

Have You Become Hooked On Fantasy Sports?

You have? Me, too! I love going through the draft picks and finding the best players in their category. Of course, there are a few other things to consider, when you are forming the best fantasy sports team. However, staying active in the sport is the first thing you need to do. Then of course, learning how to win categories is also important; after all, winning the prizes is what it's all about!

The avid fantasy sports fans with a competitive spirit will tell you it is all about winning and there are all sorts of helpful tools for enthusiasts. If you have searched the Internet, you probably already know this is true, but finding out the best information can be difficult, depending on what sport you follow. It is possible to do everything from forming a winning fishing tournament team to playing fantasy golf, so you probably just wish there was an easy solution to find out the tricks you need to know, to come out on top!

There are several ways you can master your fantasy sport and if you find the best leagues and websites to play on, there will likely be helpful tools on there, too. It looks like some of the top in the fantasy sports have their own blogs and sometimes, that's the best place to get the information you need to know, especially if you are hooked on this sports and determined to come out a winner. If you talk to some of the top fantasy team owners in their particular sport, you will find the best tips are individualized to the particular sport.

For example, picking your winning fishing tournament team might be determined by the lake the tournament is being held on and weather conditions. If it is in the northern regions, the top fisherman from the northern climates or the nearby area will know the lake the best. The same is true in fantasy baseball, because most of the enthusiasts know that you might not want to waste your draft picks on the best pitchers because the better hitters might be what you need to stock up on. Because there is inconsistency with pitchers, this is part of their winning strategy.

In some fantasy sports, you may need to move up the leader board in a particular category and you will want to watch for the players that can get you to the top in the particular category you are lagging in. There are many different strategies you can adopt when playing, but if you are hooked on them like I am, getting advice from proven leaders can be the most valuable advice you will get for winning the game.

There are some that say say fantasy sports are a game of chance, like any other games, but that is not true, when your teams are backed up with real players and real stats. What that means is you might need to search for tips from the pros in the fantasy sports leagues, whichever fantasy sport you are hooked on.

CBS Fantasy Hockey Draft Strategy For 2010-11

Every fantasy hockey league is different. Even if you're Biff Tannen and you know exactly how many points each player will score next season, it's no guarantee for fantasy victory if you do not fashion your draft strategy to the league you're in. In this post, I'll give you some tips and guidance on how…

Every fantasy hockey league is different. Even if you're Biff Tannen and you know exactly how many points each player will score next season, it's no guarantee for fantasy victory if you do not fashion your draft strategy to the league you're in. In this post, I'll give you some tips and guidance on how to draft (and win) in a standard CBS fantasy hockey league.

Point System
The first step for any league is to study the point system so you know the relative value of each position. CBS does a good job of weighing the value of defense, defense, and goaltending, to ensure that each position has something equal weight. Quick recap of points in key categories:

Offensive: Goals = 3, Assists = 2
Defense: Goals = 5, Assists = 3
Goalies: Win = 5, Saves = .2, GA = -1

Offense / Defense
So what does this mean? First off, the tendency for the inexperienced GM is to blow off drafting defensemen until the later rounds, since the big names and leading scorers obviously come from the forwards. Huge mistake here. Because of the weighting of points, a 20 goal scorer on offense will earn 60 points for his efforts, while a 20-goal performance by a defenseman will net 100 points. Another critical factor to realize is the relative gap between the elite players on defense versus on offense. When it comes to defensemen, there's a fairly small number of predictable, elite performing players. After that group of 10 or so, it drops off considering to the point where it does not matter much who you pick. The story is different for forwards. (Aside from the obvious exceptions of Crosby and Ovechkin), you will not see a huge point difference between the top 10 forwards and the next 20 or so on the list.

Bottom line here: do not be shy about drafting one or two defensemen in the first 4 rounds, even if it means enduring a laugh or two from your unschooled competition.

And what about the other stats categories?

  • Penalty Minutes – At.25 a piece, it's worth considering, but not worth planning your draft around it. There are few players in the league that bring a steady diet of points and PIMs. Those that do should be bumped up your list a few notches (Perry, Downie, Clowe, Burrows); however, do not go crazy drafting goons.
  • +/- – Perhaps the most arbitrary stat in fantasy sports. Do not waste your time trying to predict this one. Generally speaking, favor players on good teams over those with poor goal ratios. Often times a decent +/- will line up nicely with points, and when it does not, it's not worth worrying about.
  • SHG / PPG – For as often as a short handed goal is scored, pay no attention. Power Play time (and goals) on the other hand are more predictable and should factor into your rankings. CBS offers a bonus point for each goal on the power play, so give a slight boost to guys like Selanne and Holmstrom that might otherwise not worth a look.

Goalies
CBS strikes a decent balance when valuing goaltenders between wins, saves, and goals against. A player who sees a ton of shots (Vokoun, Andersson) has an edge out of the gate over a guy who only has wake up every few minutes to turn aside a casual kick save. So do not completely shy away from a good goalie on a poor defensive team. Shutouts are hard to predict, but there are certain goalie who historically will give you that added bonus on a regular basis (Brodeur, Luongo). The obvious category (and the one that may be easiest to predict) is wins. At 5 points a piece, this is where you'll want to weight a good bit of your ranking for this league.

If you look at the top 15 goalsies ranked by fantasy points earned last season under the CBS point system, it's worth noting that GAA (the stat fans tend to watch the closest) was a poor indicator of total fantasy points, compared to Saves and Wins . The top 10 goalsies in saves were pretty much the top 10 in fantasy points (in slightly different order). Meanwhile, when you look at GAA, guys like Andersson and Luongo ranked high in fantasy points but finished 19th and 17th in GAA. So when picking your goalie, focus on Wins and Saves.

Points Per Game Rule
One last point worth mentioning in CBS scoring rules is how they award points. It's not the total points earned that matter in a head-to-head matchup. It's fantasy points per game played. While this will not affect most of your decisions at draft time for rewards and defense, it's something to think about for goaltenders. This makes a split-crease situation somewhat more palatable. I did quite well in the 2nd half of last season with Niemi as my 2nd goalie, even when he was splitting time with Huet. For a long spell, he was only getting one start a week, but it was enough to pad my stats, as that one game tended to be a win. It's still risky to go with a part-time goalie in net, but in this format, you can pull it off.

Roster Limits
Then 2nd thing to consider for any league is the number of players per position, and how the league breaks down indemnity. The standard CBS rules call for:

  • 2 goals
  • 4 defense
  • 6 forwards
  • 4 bench spots

One of the nuances with the CBS draft rules merits serious consideration. While you can mix and match centers and wingers once the season begins, CBS limits you to selecting just 3 total centers at draft time. I do not understand why they do it, but if you do not play to this rule, you could seriously hurt yourself late in the draft. First off, high-scoring fantasy centers are abundant. It's tempting to jump all over guys like Stamkos, Malkin, Backstrom and Staal in the early rounds, but step back and look further down the list. Guys like Carter, Kopitar, and Tavares will be around much later in the draft, and that is really so bad? If you spend 3 early picks on centers, you'll be regretting it in round 14 when you see that Briere, Duchesne and Pavelski are still available, but CBS will not let you pick them. Budget your center selection for value and save one of the 3 for the final couple of rounds. Give yourself room to cash in on a sleeper.

Note: Perhaps the most frustrating part about this rule is that it's different in the mock drafts. In a mock draft, CBS will let you pick up to 6 centers. I had to learn this the hard way last season in my Premium League when I went to take Anze Kopitar in round 9, only to have the unfriendly red text tell me somebody else would have been benefitting from his breakout campaign. Consider yourself warned.

Also note, some CBS leagues draw distinction between left wing and right wing (as opposed to grouping them all together). If this is the case, you must mock draft this way to learn a thing or two. You'll quickly find the talent pool drops off considering by position in these drafts. Ovechkin is gold in this league, as there are no other left wingers in the same stratosphere. Centers are a dime a dozen, relatively speaking here, and should not be drawn until round 5 or later.

Goalies
In a 12 team league starting 2 goals, it's critical to get at least one elite player at this position. Having two is even better. If you do not pick a goalie in either round 1 or 2, you may lose interest in your league by Christmas, because you'll be losing on a regular basis. There's only so much talent to go around, and you'll only find a useful of useful options on the waiver wire over the course of the year. Contrast that with the forward position. You're guaranteed to always have a serviceable forward available throughout the season when the need arises, purely based on quantity.

Note: The 3 player limit also applies to goals during the draft, so if you're the type that likes to stash 2 backups on your bench, you'll have to wait until after the draft to add # 4. The approach here should be different than for centers, however. There are only 25 or so goals worth drafting, and you need a good player in your 3rd slot, so do not wait past round 11 or 12 to grab your backup.

Bench
CBS grants you 4 bench spots, one for each position. Again, once the draft is done, you can fill those 4 spaces with any mix of position. At draft time, you'll obviously want to place 1 center and 1 goalie in there. Beyond that, feel free to grab 2 defense, 2 wingers or 1 of each. You'll probably end up dropping one of those within a few weeks anyway (possibly for 4th center or goalie), so do not sweat it much.

Player Rankings
The third major factor to consider is the default player rankings in CBS. Each site features their own set of player rankings, and it's worth studying them in order to guess the tendencies of your opposition. Most GMs will tend to lean on the default rankings, particularly late in the draft. With this in mind, you can learn a lot by searching for both underrated and overrated players in their listings.

Undervalued Players
If you run through a mock draft or two, and look through the rankings, you should find some players significantly undervalued in their rankings. While you may have ranked these players quite high on your list, they may just go a few rounds later than you would have picked them. Take advantage of this information and spend that early pick on another position and get the value in the next round. This is a risky strategy, but if you're in it to win, you've got to take some chances to cash in big. Here are some players that I find to be noticeably undervalued by CBS's rankings:

Goalies: Vokoun, Turco, Fleury, Niittymaki
Defense: Gonchar, Subban, Weber
Centers: Kopitar, Duchesne, Pavelski
Wingers: Semin, Horton, Kessel, Franzen, Giroux

NOTE: If you're in a more serious league with established managers, take this advice with a grain of salt. If you know what you're doing, you'll have done your own homework and have your own custom draft list.

Overvalued Players
On the opposite end, it's worth looking for players that CBS has rated artificial high against your personal draft list. In this case, you have a decision to make. If you want the player badly enough, know that you'll have to grab him earlier than you would like. A better bet may be to resign yourself to finding value someplace else. Here are a handful of players that probably will not make it on to my squad, as someone is bound to grab them way too early for my liking:

Goalies: Halak, Anderson, Hiller
Defense: Corvo, Morrisonn, Robidas, Wideman
Centers: Kesler, Vermette
Wingers: Iginla, Burrows, Hartnell, Huselius

Disclaimer
I will be participating in a number of CBS drafts in the next month. If you happen to see me in your draft room, in all fairness, Iought to mention that I was just joking about most of this information. Please discard it and draft straight off the default rankings. I would not want to mislead you in any way …

10 NFL Fantasy Football Sleepers In 2010

In no particular order: Jabar Gaffney (WR Broncos) Gaffney has been bounced around the league through most of his career; His patience has landed him in Denver, which is starting to look like home. Gaffney has a great understanding of the offense and the experience to have the player that can pick up the in-game…

In no particular order:

Jabar Gaffney (WR Broncos)
Gaffney has been bounced around the league through most of his career; His patience has landed him in Denver, which is starting to look like home.

Gaffney has a great understanding of the offense and the experience to have the player that can pick up the in-game wrinkle on the spot. He will be overlooked by nearly everyone at your fantasy draft for a shiny new rookie. Their loss is your sleeper steal.

Anthony Gonzalez (WR Colts)
Before Gonzalez's injury early last season, fantasy experts had him very high on their boards. Now recovering and fighting for a starting job, Gonzalez is underrated and available at a late round bargain price.

Chester Taylor (RB Bears)
This RB may take a few weeks to catch on in Chicago, yet his ability is unquestionable. Taylor is the type of player Mike Martz loves and will be used in all phases of the game. Late round gem with tons of upside.

Clinton Portis (RB Redskins)
Mike Shanahan, do I need to say anymore? The system has produce greatness out of garbage. Portis has secured the starting job and will be the focal point all the McNabb media.

Matthew Stafford (QB Lions)
Fantasy points have nothing to do with a teams record or whether or not they go to the playoffs. The Lions have a future powerhouse indemnity that will be centered around Stafford and Calvin Johnson. Once this kid realizes that nobody can cover “mega-tron” and that every other target is open due to the triple coverage, the Lions will rack up points.

Julian Edelman (WR Patriots)
Edelman is not Welker, nor will he ever be. But my god, does he do good job filling in. The Patriots love Edelman's speed and have no problems throwing him the ball 5-10 balls a game. He is the ultimate insurance piece in a season full of lingering injuries.

Arian Foster (RB Texans)
Foster is unproven, yet has looked excellent this pre-season. Slaton is in the doghouse and 2nd round rookie Ben Tate is on IR; it's his job to lose.

Foster will not disappoint on such a high-powered offense. The Texans have never had an every down RB and while clearly this kid is not the answer just yet, he will be given every opportunity to try to secure that title.

Mike Williams (WR Seahawks)
Pity points? Not the way Pete Carroll sees it. Mike Williams is a born again sleeper that has a chance to add a fresh element into the Hawks line-up. He is tall with good vertical leap and (for the most part) understands what Carroll is trying to install in Seattle. Williams is a late round gem that could be a diamond in the rough.

Anthony Dixon (RB 49er's)
As much as I love Frank Gore, his history of injuries can not be ignored. The 49ers have a massive offensive line and Dixon's impressive pre-season should spill over into a solid number 2 role in San Francisco. Great sleeper RB with a ton of upside.

Jermaine Gresham (TE Bengals)
(Almost at the point where you can not call him a sleeper, but it is a deep year at tight end.) Gresham has looked amazing in his brief cameo performance in orange and black. His solid play might have been the answer the Bengals needed in releasing A.Byrant. While the attention is on the attention-whores (TO and Ochocinco) The middle of the field will be wide open for this monster rookie.

How to Win Your Fantasy Baseball League

Fantasy baseball is a blast. In my opinion, it's better than fantasy football due to the added strategy it involves. Winning your league is a passion most likely, just like it is for me. In this article, we'll look at specific tips and strategies that will help you win your league and take home the…

Fantasy baseball is a blast. In my opinion, it's better than fantasy football due to the added strategy it involves. Winning your league is a passion most likely, just like it is for me. In this article, we'll look at specific tips and strategies that will help you win your league and take home the championship.

Think Value At Your Draft

Your draft is the most important piece of the puzzle. You have to do your homework and know your strategy going in to the draft. The most important thing you can do is to think about value and draft accordingly. What I mean by this is that most people will just draft based on preseason rankings and go down the list, taking the next best available. You need to separate players into tiers and understand when you can wait to draft a certain position and when you can not. You want to draft as many players as you can in the top tiers.

Pitching vs Offense

Get a feel for the direction that most of the players in your league are going to go in prior to the draft. Typically, from my own experience, most players emphasize lease. As such, I like to typically be a contrarian and move in the opposite direction. By starting the run on pitchers, you can sometimes create a run where the players will follow your lead and snag pitchers so leaving solid offset for you. This can really work in your advantage and you can grab some of the best pitchers and offensive players leaving you with a very balanced roster.

Closers

Understand that there is a ton of turnover at the closer position. Do not overpay for saves. Instead, focus on closers that have a low WHIP and ERA as those stats tend to stay more consistent year to year.

Do these things and you can dominate your draft and dominate your league. After the draft, monitor your league and the waiver wire. If you can make 1-2 solid moves mid-season wherever they are pickups or trades, you can definitely win your league. Go get 'em!

The Craze About Fantasy Sports, Do You Understand It?

I'm sure you have noticed you are currently able to come across a fantasy sports league for almost every sport there is. Understandably, if you're an eager sports fan, as I am, you may already realize this fantasy sports craze. Nonetheless, realizing how to master building your own team and joining your own league is…

I'm sure you have noticed you are currently able to come across a fantasy sports league for almost every sport there is. Understandably, if you're an eager sports fan, as I am, you may already realize this fantasy sports craze. Nonetheless, realizing how to master building your own team and joining your own league is going to be a novel experience for several people, including those that already understand all about sports.

What I have discovered is that you need to understand the draft picks, particularly when it relates to building a team that wins and that is true of any sports team, regardless if they are real or fantasy. There is a little diplomacy needed for those that are making a fantasy sports team, that's because you already understand that everyone is going to pick the finest players in any given position, whenever they could. The main element is to realize what areas you need to stand out in and to go after a few consistent players in that area. You never know when someone will become hurt, even first-class pitchers in fantasy baseball are not consistent all of the time

Whenever you want to really know the fantasy sports craze, you should find the better leagues and the ones that that offers the best prizes, that is what I say! Of course you would like to consider entry fees and determine what the possibilities are of winning. All the same, the crucial matter is to stay active once you build a team, since there may be a chance that about a third of the managers will step down prior to the end of the season and that will give you a couple more players to choose from on waiver

If you are in it for the long haul, it makes it easier to know how to pick a winning team for your fantasy sports team because you can always wait out these other teams, if you decide you did not make the best draft picks. No matter what league you are in you will find this is the case. Keep in mind there are many who become fantasy sports addicts once they get a taste of the game.

It is a matter of picking a winning strategy and getting a good team to start with. Of course, there are a few secrets the best team owners and managers use to be consistent winners; those are the secrets you need to learn and use to create a team that wins the prizes. You can win some pretty good prizes at certain fantasy sports websites, so you need to research them carefully. Remember though, finding out the winning secrets are only part of the game … you still have to pick a winning team.

There are numerous internet sites that could help with your fantasy sports team, whether it's acquiring the info you want in producing a winning strategy or more or less how to pick your team. Weather you know what you are doing or not, you need to fully understand what it requires to win. The most popular fantasy sports are in all probability football and baseball, but today you can even play golf and even possess your own professional fishing tournament teams to win money and prizes. Acknowledging fantasy sports means staying actively involved with the sport of your choice and your fantasy team. In addition to knowing how to amass the most revenue and prizes is a great benefit!

Is The Stud Running Back Theory Dead?

For many years, almost every serious fantasy football player has subscribed to the Stud Running Back Theory at one time or another. But, with the recent trend of NFL teams using a running back by committee approach, how does this affect the stud running back theory? The stud running back theory is quite simple. During…

For many years, almost every serious fantasy football player has subscribed to the Stud Running Back Theory at one time or another. But, with the recent trend of NFL teams using a running back by committee approach, how does this affect the stud running back theory?

The stud running back theory is quite simple. During your fantasy football draft, you take running backs in the first two rounds (or possibly more). Once you have your runners locked up, you then concentrate on other positions like wide receiver and quarterback.

The thought pattern was very simple. Most leagues require the player to start two RB's each week. If you could lock up two or three of the best backs, you put your competitors at a major disadvantage (especially those that chose to take a top WR or QB and passed on runners). Five years ago, this theory worked very well, but that was also a time when NFL teams relied mainly one workhorse back.

In recent years, the trend in the NFL, is to employ the use of two backs (usually a fast runner and bruiser). Obviously, with two runners sharing the carries, the impact of the stud RB draft theory takes a major hit.

Today, there are only a handful of NFL teams that rely on one major workhorse running back. If you do not have a top 5 pick in your draft, you can probably forget about trying to land one. This has caused fantasy players to look at other strategies. Most recently, one of the trends is to load your roster will top WR's and QB's and wait on RB until the middle rounds of your draft. This is a sound strategy as you can usually get one of the major players in a RB by committee at that point.

So, is the stud running back theory dead? It certainly looks that way. Without there is a major change in the way that NFL teams use their, then there is no chance that it will ever come back!

Why Ignoring Bye Weeks Can Help Your Fantasy Football Team Succeed

When inserted in a draft, many fantasy football managers actively keep an eye on bye weeks. They will often sacrifice a better player for a lower performer because they already have someone at that position who is already out for the specified period. However, by ignoring this information, you can often do clearly better and…

When inserted in a draft, many fantasy football managers actively keep an eye on bye weeks. They will often sacrifice a better player for a lower performer because they already have someone at that position who is already out for the specified period. However, by ignoring this information, you can often do clearly better and come out with a higher record.

The reason people pay such close attention to their bye weeks is that their players can not play that week as they do not have a game. As a result, they'll need to pull players from their bench who might not be as good to use. What's more, with multiple players with bye weeks in the same week, team managers might not even be able to command a full active roster. As a result of this, having a number of players with the same week off from games can almost guarantee a loss as your entire team is unable to play that week.

However, is that such a big deal? Even if you lose one week in the season, it absolutely will not decide your position in the rankings. With a fantasy football season of 13 weeks, losing one week will not rule you out of the playoffs. However, settling for lower quality players in order to ensure you have players to field each week could result in lower numbers every week, making a much larger impact on your overall record.

As such, when drafting players, especially starters for your fantasy football team, focus more on quality than bye weeks. The bye weeks may help you win a game, but the quality of the players will help you win the season.

The Challenges of Running Back By Committee Offenses

One major change that seems to be spreading through offs in the NFL is the use of running backs by committee. In this design, teams will rotate between a number of running backs, allowing their options to rest and to be utilized in different situations as the team sees fit. While this has helped a…

One major change that seems to be spreading through offs in the NFL is the use of running backs by committee. In this design, teams will rotate between a number of running backs, allowing their options to rest and to be utilized in different situations as the team sees fit. While this has helped a number of teams improve, it places a big danger for fantasy teams that may depend on these players each Sunday.

This issue has been around for some time, although it used to be more in a limited format. When near the goal line, teams would often switch to their third down back, often a bigger player who is able to force the opponent to concede a few yards, whether they like it or not. This type of play is dangerous as these third down players can steal touchdowns, costing you multiple points in the process.

However, the current format goes even further with teams aggressively alternating between two or more runners. As a result of this, it's nearly impossible to expect a large amount of points out of your top running back, because his overall value will be close to half that of a player on his own. This comes because of the split in yardage as both running backs take carries.

Finally, the last trouble with running back by committee charges is how unpredictable it makes the situation. Some weekends, a team may depend on one guy, but the next weekend they put their faith on the other option. As a result of this tossup, your players will have unpredictable performances, pulling in big numbers one week and hardly any next.

Overall, these running back by committee charges make it necessary to more carefully watch your options. Grab the backs that are alone when you can, and in other cases, just hope it's your guy that gets in the end zone.