Fantasy Baseball Players to Watch After the All-Star Break

In this article I'm going to go over fantasy baseball players to watch after the all-star break. These baseball players have done historically well in the second half of the season over their careers and are prime players to trade for in your full season leagues or buy cheap if you play daily fantasy baseball.…

In this article I'm going to go over fantasy baseball players to watch after the all-star break. These baseball players have done historically well in the second half of the season over their careers and are prime players to trade for in your full season leagues or buy cheap if you play daily fantasy baseball.

The first name that stands out as a player to watch in the second half is Billy Butler of the Kansas City Royals. Butlers name has been thrown around as a player that could be dealt before the trading block. The main reason teams are interested in Butler is his past performance after the All-Star break and not because of his slow first half. Butler finished the first half with only three home runs and 36 runs batted in.

Now that does not look good for fantasy owners but if you look back at his second half performance over the past two years it may change your mind. In 2013, Butler finished tied for 7th in all of baseball with 81 second half hits. The season before Butler finished second only behind Derek Jeter with 102 hits. Butler has also shown some power in the second half hitting a combined 20 home runs over those two seasons.

The other name that stands out is Doug Fister of the Washington Nationals. Fister has stacked up a 15-8 record over the past two seasons in the second half in 28 starts. Over the two season Fister stuck out 155 batters and allowed 61 earned runs. If you also look at Fister's last two starts before the break he picked up back to back wins allowing five runs in 14 innings pitched.

Here is a list of fantasy players that have performed well in the second half of the season:

Chris Davis, Baltimore Orioles: Davis hit 16 home runs and drove in 45 runs in 65 second half games last season. Over the past two seasons Davis has a combined 35 home runs.He could have been a good player to target for a trade in season long leagues. For daily fantasy he makes a cheaper option for gpp plays but I would still avoid him in cash games.

Adrian Beltre, Texas Rangers: The Rangers third baseman picked up 81 hits after the All-Star break last year including 10 doubles and nine home runs.

Tanner Roark, Washington Nationals: Roark might not be a name that many people have heard of but he has put up some solid numbers for the Nationals. Last season Roark picked up 7 wins in 14 games for the Nationals and posted an 1.51 earned run average. In eight of his last 10 starts for the Nationals this season Roark has pitched at least six innings.

Kolten Wong, Saint Louis: Wong's rookie season started out rough but he started to get in a grove in July posting a .321 average with 5 home runs, 8 RBI and 3 steals during that month. He could be a good waiver wire pick-up or a nice punt option for daily fantasy.

These are a few players that might help you in fantasy baseball after the all-star break.

How to Have More Success in Daily Fantasy Baseball

When choosing to play daily fantasy sports, you are choosing to commit time and money towards, what is essentially, a hobby. You have to spend money to enter fantasy sports contest in order to win money from them; it is considered gambling in most states. It is up to you to decide how much time…

When choosing to play daily fantasy sports, you are choosing to commit time and money towards, what is essentially, a hobby. You have to spend money to enter fantasy sports contest in order to win money from them; it is considered gambling in most states. It is up to you to decide how much time you want to commit to playing fantasy sports.

Spending a few minutes everyday may not be enough. Quickly glancing through the slate and just throwing a lineup together will most likely not result in consistent success. Here are some ways to improve your success when playing Daily fantasy baseball.

First, choose hot players for your lineup and avoid cold ones. In sports, momentum is a very real thing and players that are playing well tend to build off each good game they have. Players that perform well for multiple games will often be riding a “hot” streak, you want to target these players. If a player has scored 30 fantasy sports in his 3 of his last 5 games there is a pretty good chance he will play well in the 6th. Likewise, if a player is not performing well game after game, or is “cold”, avoid using this player. In baseball, hot and cold streaks are very prevalent. If a hitter is hitting well consistently, he is probably seeing the baseball really well and are picking it up quickly. The opposite would be if a player is striking out a lot or mis-hitting a lot of balls, he is probably not seeing the ball very well. Always try to find the hitter who are hot for your lineup.

Next, always take advantage of match ups. Taking advantage of good match ups is the most important thing you can do to consistently have success in daily fantasy sports. Having a “good match up” means that a player is projected to have a higher chance of success against an opposing pitcher or vice versa. Your pitcher (s) will always make or break your lineup. If you lock in a pitcher that gets sheled you will have a very small chance of earning any cash in your contests. When considering a pitcher for your lineup always consider the matchup. Target pitchers who are facing a weak offensive team or a team that has been strugglingitting. Even if the pitcher is one of the top pitchers in the league, avoid them if they are facing a good hiring team. A good rule of thumb is to avoid pitchers who are facing the top 5-10 offensive teams in the league. If you come across a good pitcher facing a team who is 20th or worse in hiring they are usually a solid pick. Using both hot players and ones with good match ups will increase your chances of having success in daily fantasy baseball.

Differences in Daily Fantasy Sports Sites

There are only two main sites that users can choose from to play daily fantasy, DraftKings and FanDuel. Both sites share similarities but at the same time are drastically different. Both are similar in popularity and have been around since the beginning of daily fantasy sports. Both sites offer hundreds of contracts and pay out…

There are only two main sites that users can choose from to play daily fantasy, DraftKings and FanDuel. Both sites share similarities but at the same time are drastically different. Both are similar in popularity and have been around since the beginning of daily fantasy sports. Both sites offer hundreds of contracts and pay out millions of dollars every day. The sites pay out at an identical rate and the contests offer the same rewards on both sites. So how do you choose which one to use?

The answer is pretty simple; try both of them out and choose which one you like more. Both sites will pay out the same. So, profitability and your chances of winning are basically undistinguishable between the two. The difference between the sites is how you build your lineup for your daily contests. For example, in daily NBA contests, on DraftKings you choose eight players and on FanDuel you choose nine players. DraftKings gives you a salary cap of $ 50,000, allowing you to choose eight players with combined territories of $ 50,000 or less. On FanDuel, you have a $ 60,000 salary cap to choose nine players to fit into your lineup. Salaries of each player are different on each site. A popular opinion is that you can have more superstars or more higher salaried players on FanDuel because of the higher salary cap. This may be true, but everyone else you are competing against also gets more superstars or better players so it does not really make a difference.

FanDuel's lineups are constructed of two point guards, two shooting guards, two small forwards, two power forwards, but only one center. DraftKings' lineups are constructed of one of each of the five positions (PG, SG, SF, PF, C) and then one guard, so you must choose a point or shooting guard, one forward, either a small or power forward, and then finally a “Utility” player (this mean you can choose any player at any position) So the main difference between the sites is the strategy you use to construct your lineups. I suggest going and playing around on both sites and seeing which one you like better.

I would suggest choosing one site and playing that one only, not both. The strategies are different for both sites so once you choose you will want to stick with one and perfect your own strategy of building daily lineups. Bouncing back and fourth between sites will just be more challenging and require more time and research. Once you figure out which site you want to use, use it everyday and perfect your own strategy. The more times you play and the more experience you gain in creating lineups, the better you will become. There is a skill in building these lineups daily and with all skills you have to practice them to get better.

How to Play Fantasy Basketball

With the start of the NBA season underway, NBA fans across the country are lining up to play fantasy basketball. The two most popular formats being used include season long fantasy leagues and daily NBA fantasy contests. Both formats are available online through popular sports sites like Yahoo.com, NBA.com, DraftKings.com and FanDuel.com among others. Each…

With the start of the NBA season underway, NBA fans across the country are lining up to play fantasy basketball. The two most popular formats being used include season long fantasy leagues and daily NBA fantasy contests. Both formats are available online through popular sports sites like Yahoo.com, NBA.com, DraftKings.com and FanDuel.com among others. Each format requires a different approach, which provides a little something for players of all experience levels.

NBA Fantasy Leagues

For years now, fantasy sports leagues have been run for the benefit of managers who want to manage their own team through the rigors of an entire season. While most leagues are played for fun, some league commissioners will organize leagues with an entry fee and prize money being distributed at the end of the season.

The process starts with an organized draft. The most popular draft format is the standard “snake-draft” where a players' draft position is determined by random draw. For returning keeper leagues, the draft positions may be determined by the manager's placing in the prior season. Over the past few years, auction drafts have increased in popularity. With this format, each manager is given a bankroll, which is used to bid on players until their roster is full.

In both formats, each manager is required to draft a full team of players based on the league's setup configuration. Most leagues have as many as 10 starting roster positions plus bench players. Depending on the league's rules, managers can make player moves on either a daily basis or weekly basis. Scoring is determined by league rules and the competition is head-to-head on a weekly basis. Towards the end of the season, the teams with the best overall records head off into the playoffs, which usually cover the last 2-3 weeks of the NBA regular season.

Daily NBA Fantasy Contests

For managers who like their action fast and furious with cash on the line, popular fantasy sites provide access to daily contests. These daily contest come in a variety of formats that are listed on the website. Managers can choose to compete heat-to-head with a smaller group of managers ranging from 2 to 25 contestants. These contests are usually designed and posted by one of the contestants who then open up the entry process to any conflicting who would like to participate based on the contest's setup. The entry fees range from $ 5 all the way up to $ 1,000 per contestant. While some contests are winner takes all, contests with more than 10 contestants may offer small consolation prizes. In all contests, the fantasy sports site will take a fee (usually 10%) to cover administrative costs plus profits.

The other popular format is sponsored contests provided by the website. These contests usually have thousands of entries with huge guaranteed prize packages in the offering for a reliably small entry fee. The larger the participation in these contests, the higher the number of places that will get paid. The prize packages may include large cash prizes, consumer goods or special event prize packages where something like a Super Bowl weekend might be on the line. Many times, managers can earn a free entry fee by winning smaller satellite contests along the way.

The contest rules and scoring parameters are provided by the website. Each manager gets a salary cap (normally $ 50,000) to use when selecting players. Each player that is scheduled to play on a given night will be assigned a salary cap value. Obviously, the better the player, the higher the value. The team structure is usually PG, SG, SF, PF, C, G, F, and UTIL player.

Now that you have a general idea how to play fantasy basketball, it's time to join in the fray. If you choose to play in daily contests, you need to remember that a lot of managers have a significant amount of experience, which might leave you at a disadvantage. The bottom line is you should never put more money on the line than you can afford to lose.

3 Steps to Setting a Daily Fantasy Hockey Lineup

If you're new to daily fantasy hockey, setting a lineup can be a daunting task. However, to give yourself a fair chance of a return on investment, all you need to do is apply a few simple tactics. The research can be time consuming, but usually pays off at the end of the night. Let's…

If you're new to daily fantasy hockey, setting a lineup can be a daunting task. However, to give yourself a fair chance of a return on investment, all you need to do is apply a few simple tactics. The research can be time consuming, but usually pays off at the end of the night. Let's get started.

Step # 1: Extrapolate potential indemnity

If you're not familiar with NHL talent, you can rely on statistics to show you the way. Look for teams that give up a lot of goals and exploit them by starting one of their opponent's lines / defensive units (step 2) that scores a lot of goals. You, however, must be careful not to rely on too small of a sample size as an indication of a poor defense or formidable offense. If a team has played under 10 games, it may be a fluke they're allowed 4 goals a game. Perhaps they've recently made a goaltender switch or have gotten an injured star back from injury. You can also utilize the previous season's statistics. However, you must again be careful and be sure there were no major changes to the team's roster during the off season. Also, look at the recent game log. Contradictory to what I said above, hockey is a streaky sport. If a team has scored 20 goals in 4 games, odds favor them continuing to play well. I'm not trying to confuse you, but encouraging you to look at a match up from all angles. You can also look at the Las Vegas lines to see which teams are heavily favored in games with a 5.5 over / under. The standard over under is 5, so 5.5 means the public is expecting more scoring than usual. Any team favored by more than 150 in these games (or at all really) is expected to score 3-4 goals. I recommend first analyzing the statistics, picking 2 or more teams you think will have a good offensive night and then confirm your expectations are legitimate by looking at the game line. Relying merly on the game lines can be disastrous. Remember, odds makers set the line at the point they calculate will draw the same amount of money on each side. They are experts at predicting bettors behavior, not game outcomes. So, now that you've decided which teams will score adequately, it's time to decide which specific players to roster.

Step # 2: Identify offensive lines, defensive units, and power play units

Each team rosters 18 offensive players, generally 12 forwards and 6 defenseman. Forwards play in groups of 3 for about a minute before substituting for the next group of 3 or 'line' (hockey is that exhausting). Defenseman play in groups of 2, but it's not both of them substituting out as often as it is 3 forwards. Defenseman skate a lot less than forwards and, then, can often stay in the game for longer periods of time. The point being: it's difficult to predict what fellow players a defenseman will share ice time with through the game. Each team also has 2 power play units used to increase the chances of scoring when they have a man advantage. Look to add an line line, along along with a defenseman or goalie (more below), from a team you think will score goals plentifully. When considering an off line, check if they all play together on a power play unit as well. Check if they all receive ample time on ice (TOI). A player on a 3rd or 4th line may get a significant amount less TOI than his line mates. It may seem counter intuitive adding 3 or 4 players from the same team, but one goal scored with 3 or 4 of your players on the ice will bombard your opponent. For example, if you have 4 players on the ice and one of them scores assisted by another (or even 2), you will have already compiled enough offensive points to win many head to head games, depending on the scoring system. If the other team scores with your players on the ice, this tactic (commonly called stacking) can also lose you points quickly, but that's the risk we take when setting a favorable lineup. Of course, having a team's first line with a defenseman that plays with the three on the first power play unit is ideal, but budget does not always allow this. Do not be afraid to start a teams second or third line in a favorable match up. Especially if the line sticks together on the second power play unit. All in all, choosing offensive players based on match up, as opposed to talent level is the philosophy The opposite being true with goaltenders.

Step # 3: Choose elite goaltenders

It's always a good strategy to start the most talented goalenders on talented teams when setting your lineup. They're often the most expensive options, but for good reason. A goaltender plays the entire game (ideally) and has a chance to score at any point. In the majority of scoring systems a dominant goal tendering performance will usually produce more points than a dominant offensive performance and it's much easier to predict which high priced goaltender will allow few goals in a win than it is to predict which high quoted forward will score 2 or 3 points. So, look for the most expensive options, very importantly making sure they are confirmed to play in the game. On countless occasions I've seen elite goalktenders with the night off in rosters. If you're unsure which goaltender to roster, look at their career stats in comparison to their opponents. Look at their recent games. Much like step 1 above, look at their opponents offensive ability and the line on the game in Las Vegas. Occidentally, a goalie is historically great, but has faltered in recent games. This will drive his price down. If there's not another elite talent playing, start the struggling star. Odds are he will rebound soon.

More information is always a good thing – I find this true in life and in the fantasy hockey realm. Be sure to gain as much information as possible when doing your research. Has Chicago recently lost a player to injury? Does Buffalo play significantly better at home? Does Philadelphia perform well on no rest? When its time to enter your lineup, be conservative. Only risk 1% of your bankroll on each game, and only 25% on any lineup. If you have $ 500, entering 25 $ 5 head to head games is advisable. On a bad night, you will not lose much and on a good night you will see a very high return on investment.

How to Play Fantasy Football for Beginners

If you are entering the world of fantasy football for the first time, you are sure to wonder why it took you so long to come around. Playing fantasy football, whether for fun or real money, is a great way to enjoy one of America's favorite sports, professional football. As a beginner, you will most…

If you are entering the world of fantasy football for the first time, you are sure to wonder why it took you so long to come around. Playing fantasy football, whether for fun or real money, is a great way to enjoy one of America's favorite sports, professional football. As a beginner, you will most likely be playing with experienced managers that already know the nuances of the game. This quick guide is designed to show how to play fantasy football for beginners, and maybe level the playing field just a little.

Picking a League Format

When you sign onto a free or real money fantasy football site, you will be asked to register. If it's a real money site, you will also be asked to make a deposit. Free sites typically are used for league play where you draft a team and play that team in a league format for an entire season. Real money sites focus on weekly competitions where you pay the contest fee and choose your team for that particular contest only based on salary cap limitations. Regardless of which format you choose, you must take the time to understand the rules and the scoring in order to decide how to best develop your team.

Tips on Picking Players

As a beginner, you will most likely have a casual approach to picking players, preferring not to invest a great deal of time on statistical analysis. That's fine and understandable, but you should be aware that some of your competition will use that information, which provides a bit of an advantage over those who do not.

Tips for Picking Players in an Annual League Format

Note: standard leagues use offensive skilled position players, kickers and team defenses only. If individual defensive players are included, it is referred to as a “IDP ” league. Beginners should avoid auction drafts and stick with standard “snake” drafts .

1. As you are drafting your team, pick the best available player for each specific position first before you start drafting backup players.

2. Draft a balanced team and try not to over-focus on one particular position. Also, you want to avoid drafting your favorite players unless they will truly benefit you in the scoring.

3. Look for a “scoring bias” in the screening rules. This reflects to the notion that some leagues sets scoring rules that might favor the QB a little. If so, you want a top QB . If not, you should give a little extra focus to running backs and wide receivers.

4. Pick kickers and team defenses towards the end of the draft as they seldom provided any real advantage over a full season.

5. Watch your “bye” weeks. You want to make sure both your QBs do not have the same bye week, which would force you to the waiver wire or to lose points.

Tips for Picking Players for Weekly Contests

When playing for money, you should alter your focus. You are not drafting players, you are selecting the best group of players you can without exceeding the salary cap.

1. Find value by selecting good offensive players scheduled to play against bad defensive teams. On the other side of the coin, you should avoid offensive players going up against the best defenses.

2. You should read weather reports and try to avoid players who might be playing in rain or snow. If you selected your teams well in advance, go back and make adjustments as necessary before game time.

3. Look for streaking players who may be under-valued and avoid slumbing players who may be over-valued. Do not be afraid to play the trends.

4. Use every dime of your salary cap.

5. Never play with more money than you can afford to lose.

Every week, it is up to you to manage your team. In league formats, fellow managers are expecting you to show up and play every week to the best of your ability whether you are in first place or last. As time passes, you will better understand the objectives and will start making better decisions. At the end of the day, this is a game. Have a great time and enjoy.

2015 All Under-Valued Fantasy Football Starters

QB Ryan Tannehill (Miami) – Tannehill lived up to expectations in 2014 and delivered for over 4,000 yards and 27 TDs against only 12 INTs. He was second to Lamar Miller in rushing and he now has three fine young receivers in Jarvis Landry, Ken Stills and DeVante Parker who will mesh with the talented…

QB Ryan Tannehill (Miami) – Tannehill lived up to expectations in 2014 and delivered for over 4,000 yards and 27 TDs against only 12 INTs. He was second to Lamar Miller in rushing and he now has three fine young receivers in Jarvis Landry, Ken Stills and DeVante Parker who will mesh with the talented quarterback. Additionally, the Dolphins added the veteran presences of Greg Jennings and new TE Jordan Cameron, so the Dolphins have plenty of weapons. Tannehill is in line for a 4,500 yard season, and considering you can get him in the ninth round; those are good dividends.

Also consider: Philip Rivers (San Diego), Carson Palmer (Arizona)

RB Latavius ​​Murray (Oakland) – Murray was finally given an opportunity late last season and shined. He has great speed and vision to go along with a solid 6'3 “230lb frame. The only threat he has to his Touches is Roy Helu catching passes out of the backfield, but Murray projects to be a workhorse this season and should put up nice numbers, especially if QB David Carr continues to improve with each game.

Also consider: Carlos Hyde (San Francisco), Rashard Jennings (New York Giants)

WR Charles Johnson (Minnesota) – Johnson really gelled with QB Teddy Bridgewater last year as Teddy became more comfortable as the starting QB. In the Vikings last 7 games; CJ tallied 25 catches for 415 yards and 2 TDs. With the addition of RB Adrian Peterson and WR Mike Wallace, I expect Johnson to have more room to run his routes and make many more plays than last year and many more big plays. Johnson has great size and an existing rapport with Bridgewater. Wallace is a larger name but Johnson will have a larger impact as is a steal in round 9 and beyond.

Also consider: John Brown (Arizona), Marques Colston (New Orleans)

TE Richard Rodgers (Green Bay) – Actually, Rodgers qualifies as more of a true Sleeper than merely under-valued. Earlier this summer, the concern about Rodgers was how often QB Rodgers would look his way, but, since the season-ending injury to WR Jordy Nelson, Rodgers becomes more of a factor in the offensive as defenses key on WR Randall Cobb and Rodgers looks to a group of relatively unfamiliar targets in Davante Adams, Ty Montgomery and Richard Rodgers. He is definitely worth a late pick in deeper leagues.

Also consider: Jordan Cameron (Miami), Charles Clay (Buffalo)

D Minnesota Vikings – the Vikings defense played very well last season, especially after the offensive began to perform better. The entire unit is young especially as the offense matured and stayed on the field longer each game. This unit is young and fast. The front four are not household names, at least not outside of the state, but Brian Robinson, Shariff Floyd, Linval Joseph, and Everson Griffen are collectively more talented than 75% of the defensive front four units in the league. They were weak in the secondary last season but the addition of rookie Trae Waynes will help motivate the unit into playing better or losing their spot to him.

There are plenty of Cash Fantasy Football Leagues open that will be drafting in the next 2 weeks at MFS. You can check the list of Open Fantasy Football Leagues and find one or more than suit your needs and put this advice to use! This list varies a bit from a list of Fantasy Football Sleepers as these players are expected to have a good season, but their Average Draft Position does not reflect how good of a season they will have compared to others at their position.

Everybody Seems to Offer Fantasy Football Advice – Stick to These 6 Principles and Win Consistently

As you enter the new fantasy football season, you would be well-advised to take a gander at your competition. It would be helpful for you to understand those who seek the league title that you sure covet. Of course, those of you playing in casual free league might not feel compelled to go overboard with…

As you enter the new fantasy football season, you would be well-advised to take a gander at your competition. It would be helpful for you to understand those who seek the league title that you sure covet. Of course, those of you playing in casual free league might not feel compelled to go overboard with your analysis, but playing against managers with high levels of success warrants your attention. By taking the time to assess your situation, you will better understand the effort it is going to take to claim the title or at least some level of respectability. For you money league managers, this is an imperative.

Rules for Managing to Win

For the inexperienced and novice managers out there, these simple rules are designed to enlighten you to things the experienced players have already learned. For those of you who believe you have it all under control, let this information serve as a friendly reminder.

Rule # 1 – Manage Your Team – Year after year and league after league, the managers who consistently make the playoffs have one thing in common; They take the time to manage their team on a weekly basis. They always seem to have the best players on their active roster and they never miss a chance to raid the waiver wire for the up-and-comers. Awareness is they key because a player listed as doubtful after sustaining an injury on Friday has tripped up more playoff hopes than you can imagine when the manager missed the opportunity to adjust their roster.

Rule # 2 – Stats are King – Have you ever wondered why your opponent was astute enough to sit his number one quarterback in favor of number two? The answer is he probably took the time to find out his number one playing against against the best passing defense in the league. If that same team's offense has a great running game to boot, old number one is not going to get the number of opportunities needed to maximize score. All that astute manager did was use facts to make a decision that more times than not, works out to their benefit. If you play in money leagues, you are competing against opponents who use all the tricks. Review your stats and match-ups and do not select your players based on emotion or loyalty.

Rule # 3 – The Waiver Wire in a Sanctuary for Winners – By week four if not sooner, the injuries will start piling up and the underachievers will be exposed. For every issue, there is a possible solution on the waiver wire that might end up being a diamond in the rough. You should keep a particular eye on # 2 and # 3 running backs on every roster. The casualty rate for RBs in the NFL sits at about 35% -40% every year. Remember, every opportunity you miss is one you opponent may claim.

Rule # 4 – Set Aside Personal Biases – You might be fiercely loyal to a particular team or certain players. That said, fantasy football is not personal, it's a game. Do not get in the habit of loading your team with players you love if the facts do not support your action. Also, you have to be prepared to bench under-performers who stand to put you at a disadvantage every week you include them on your roster. This may come as a shock, but no one except the managers in your league will know you benched your favorite player.

Rule # 5 – Get Help When Appropriate – There is plenty of free advice related to fantasy football on the Internet. Much of this advice comes from guys who do the statistical work and do not mind sharing their efforts with strangers in need. If you are playing in a serious money league, it may even be worth the investment to pay a small fee for weekly advice. You do not have to know everything. You will improve your management skills if you learn from the advice you get free or otherwise.

Rule # 6 – Always Play to Win – Everyone has been done in leagues where managers wave the white flag and stop managing their teams once they feel they are out of the play race. Do not be one of those guys. You be the guy who finished last, but cost someone a playoff spot the last week of the season by beating someone, not by letting someone beat you. It's called losing with dignity.

Hopefully, this advice will set you free to become the best fantasy football manager you can be. Experience is a great teacher and the one thing you must learn now is fantasy football is a game and it should be played for enjoyment, even in money leagues.

Fantasy Football Tips to Play Fantasy Football Like a Pro

The best way to learn any subject is to experience it firsthand. No amount of cheatsheets, checklists, buddy advice, or new ideas can replace the wisdom that comes with years of experience. The good news is that it is possible to glean some knowledge from those that have been there before. Our science is built…

The best way to learn any subject is to experience it firsthand. No amount of cheatsheets, checklists, buddy advice, or new ideas can replace the wisdom that comes with years of experience.

The good news is that it is possible to glean some knowledge from those that have been there before. Our science is built by standing on the shoulders of giants, and our games are the same way.

The following are tips every fantasy football pro learns through their experience.

1. Understand what type of league you are in.

The type of league is a factor in the value of a player. Brandin Cooks is a prime example; Cooks was a great pickup in dynamic leagues last year, but was not more than a sleeper option in redraft leagues until this year. After gaining some experience, he's projected as a potential stud.

2. Know your league's roster rules.

Sure, it would have been great to have Marshawn Lynch, DeMarco Murray, and LeSean McCoy as your first three picks, but if the starting line can only include two running backs, a lot of points will go to waste while another position suffers. A pro always has a full roster plan in mind.

3. Vary picks based on scoring system.

Having a great quarterback is nice, but most leagues nerf their scoring capability by reducing the number of points earned from passing stats. Aaron Rodgers is worth a high draft pick at six points per TD and one point per 20 passing yards. Four per TD and one point per 30? Not so much.

The most common example is PPR (points per reception). Wide receivers gain value, and the running back rankings get shuffled. Matt Forte is a mid to low end RB1 in traditional scoring, but in a league that uses PPR, he's a stud. One point per receipt adds 100 points to his total in 2014 alone.

4. Draft safer picks early.

Not every “safe” player gets to play the season, but it's possible to reduce the risk. Every player available early is a great player. Aside from last year, picking Adrian Peterson over Darren “Glass Man” McFadden was a no brainer to any pro. Early picks are the cornerstones of a team, and picking an injury or legal risk in the first round is unnecessary.

5. Draft for upside after starters and subs are set.

Grabbing a halfway decent starter as a second or third backup wide receiver may sound great, but it's a terrible idea. Players can and will go down during the season. More importantly, players can and will pop in a given year. Arian Foster the year he broke out, Kelvin Benjamin last year, and Alfred Blue and Davante Adams this year are great examples of “sleepers” – players that surprised most owners and put up top end fantasy scores. The league champion will likely have one or two starters that no one expected, and without a league uses 20 man rosters replacement level players to cover bye weeks and injuries will be readily available.

6. Never draft a kicker or defense early.

Every rule has exceptions, but think about the previous tip. Acquiring a top end kicker or defense requires a pick somewhere in the eight to tenth rounds, a good range to pick top end sleepers. Kickers vary wildly from year to year, and many pro fantasy players use a different defense each week to chase easy matchups. A “streaming defense” can outperform even top end defenses. That does not mean drafting the Seahawks is not worth the pick, there's just more value in waiting on a top defense.

These are just the beginning. It's possible to write entire novels on fantasy football, and each and every rule can occasionally be broken. The key is to remember this one word: value. The best fantasy football owners find ways to generate extra value and acquire better players for a lower cost.

Take these tips, play like a pro, and win your league if you can. Good luck!

2015 Most Over-Valued Fantasy Football Players

Over-valued fantasy football players are not necessarily players that will struggle this season. They are players that are being drawn too high in the draft compared to their predicted output versus players at the same position being drafted much lower. Successful fantasy football team owners are the owners that recognize value in each round and…

Over-valued fantasy football players are not necessarily players that will struggle this season. They are players that are being drawn too high in the draft compared to their predicted output versus players at the same position being drafted much lower. Successful fantasy football team owners are the owners that recognize value in each round and draft accordingly. There is no set methodology on what position to draft in each round or what players should be drawn in each round. As always, KNOW YOUR SCORING system and let that dictate your drafting strategy and be flexible about your strategy so you can make adjustments on the fly based on how the draft is unfolding so you can recognize Value in the players still available.

Assuming a standard fantasy football scoring system, we are going to cite players that we are seeing drawn too high compared to other players at their position. Currently, the most over-valued fantasy football players that far, according to their Average Draft Position, are as follows.

QB: Peyton Manning (Denver) – Peyton began showing his age towards the end of 2014. He was still the third highest scoring QB last season, but that will not happen this year and he is being drafted as the third QB. Manning is a bit slower, throws more INTs, the Broncos are selling much more on their running game and Peyton has lost a few weapons. Wes Welker and Julian Thomas are gone and RB CJ Anderson is breaking out. I still expect 4000 yards and 30 TDs from Peyton, but you can get that kind of production later in the draft from numerous other QBs … QBs that are much younger and more mobile than the 39-year old Manning.

RB: Jonathan Stewart (Carolina) – There are many people that felt that Stewart cane into his own last season and it will springboard him into a successful 2015. Sure, he averaged 100 ypg in his last 4 and the Panthers did let RB DeAngelo Williams go, but I do not buy it. He has only had one season of over 200 carries due to injuries and has already tweaked his ankle this summer. If you decide that he is worth the risk, make sure to also grab Cameron Artis-Payne to plug in the day the switchover happens.

WR Sammy Watkins (Buffalo) – Sammy Watkins is as talented as a receiver gets in the AFC East, but you will not notice this season. Kyle Orton was a serviceable QB, but he has retired and the list of QBs now in Buffalo makes a person cringe; Matt Cassel, EJ Manuel and Tyrod Taylor. Coach Rex Ryan has faced this situation before and I can guarantee you that he is going to try to win by running the ball and letting his defense do the bulk of the work. Also, Sammy is coming off hip surgery which is definitely not going to help. The NFL is chocked full of quality WRs so do not spend a pick on Watkins as it could just be a wasted pick.

TE Julius Thomas (Jacksonville) – Julius is very talented but he may never see the production that he had in Denver again. Of course, he has 46 million reasons not to be too upset about it. Thomas' greatest value has always come in the form of TDs. Because Denver had so much talent, he was never relied upon to be a catch / yardage-heavy option. Now, Jacksonville is a large devoid of receiving talent, so it could mean that Thomas will compensate for his drop in TD receptions with more catches and yards, but it could also mean that he will face double-teams. He is far too risky to consider taking him in single-digit rounds when there could be a half-dozen tight ending that end up with the same, or better, numbers that are drawn in double-digit rounds.

K Stephen Gostkowski (New England) – Gostkowski was the highest scoring kicker in the NFL last season so he should be the highest crafted kicker, correct? Well, I would agree, but why take ANY kicker before your last or second-to last round? Philly K Cody Parker was a mere 2 field goals behind Gostkowski in points and no one is thinking about taking him over a WR4 or RB4. Fill your bench before taking a kicker.

D Seattle – Along the same lines as a kicker, WAIT on your defense. Unless you have a robust scanning system that rewards defenses heavily, the difference in points between the top dozen defenses is too small to think about taking a defense in single-digit rounds. Seattle gets a LOT of press and has been to two straight Super Bowls, but they were not the top-scoring defense in fantasy last year even after having an ADP in single-digit rounds. As a matter of fact, in some formats, they were the 7-9th highest scoring defense in 2014. Before I take a kicker, I always start two rounds before and grab my first defense then grab my second defense. The top defenses fluctuate every year. Who would have figured that Philly would have had the highest-scoring fantasy defense last season?